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Aug 27, 2014
Aug 23, 2014 / 33 notes

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011) dir.Göran Olsson
“This whole, kind of, falling in love with black things for a short period of time is essentially racist. It still is hypothesized on a great sense of separateness and a sense of treating black activities as a kind of curiosity; either benign or threatening, one or the other. When it’s threatening, ‘Oh my god, they’re going to riot or something’. And if it’s benign, ‘Let’s let them paint or draw or sing or dance, whatever they want to do. Until we, the white community, get tired of it’ and that whole structure, is essentially racist.”
Aug 23, 2014 / 4,829 notes

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011) dir.Göran Olsson

“This whole, kind of, falling in love with black things for a short period of time is essentially racist. It still is hypothesized on a great sense of separateness and a sense of treating black activities as a kind of curiosity; either benign or threatening, one or the other. When it’s threatening, ‘Oh my god, they’re going to riot or something’. And if it’s benign, ‘Let’s let them paint or draw or sing or dance, whatever they want to do. Until we, the white community, get tired of it’ and that whole structure, is essentially racist.”

(via palmares-politics)

Aug 22, 2014

Ibeyi—Oya

Aug 22, 2014

evoking Oshún

Ibeyi —River

Aug 21, 2014 / 997 notes

todayinhistory:

August 21st 1831: Nat Turner’s rebellion begins

On this day in 1831 the Virginian slave Nat Turner began the deadliest slave rebellion the United States had ever seen, which resulted in the deaths of 55 whites. Turner, a slave preacher, had come to believe that God intended for him to lead a black uprising against the injustice of slavery. In the evening of August 21st 1831, Turner and his co-conspirators met in the woods to make their plans and early the next morning began the rebellion by killing Turner’s master’s family. Turner and his men, who soon numbered over 80, then went from house to house assaulting the white inhabitants. Eventually a local militia, and then federal and state troops, confronted the rebels and dispersed the group. Turner himself initially evaded capture but was captured on October 30th. Subsequently Turner, along with over fifty other rebels, was executed. However the retribution for Nat Turner’s rebellion did not end there. The uprising sent shockwaves across the South, and while full scale rebellion such as Turner’s was rare in the Deep South due to the rigid enforcement of the slave system, caused widespread fear of another rebellion. In the ensuing hysteria over 200 innocent black slaves were killed by white mobs. Turner’s rebellion came close to ending slavery in Virginia, as in its wake the state legislature considered abolishing the ‘peculiar institution’. However the measure was voted down and instead the state decided to increase plantation discipline and limit slaves’ autonomy even further by banning them from acting as preachers and learning to read. Similar measures were adopted across the slave-holding South and thus Nat Turner’s rebellion increased the South’s commitment to slavery, despite undermining the pro-slavery argument that it was a benevolent system and slaves were content. Turner has left behind a complicated legacy, with some seeing him as an African-American hero and others as a religious fanatic and villain; his memory raises the eternal question of whether violence is justified to bring about necessary change.

Aug 21, 2014 / 13 notes

Virginia history: On August 21, 1831 Nat Turner led an uprising of enslaved people in Southampton County, Virginia. In the immediate aftermath, across Virginia, North Carolina, and other southern states, vigilante murders by White militias and mobs killed hundreds of Black people and state legislators passed new laws prohibiting education of slaves and free Blacks, restricting rights of assembly and other civil rights for free Blacks, and requiring White ministers to be present at Black religious services.

Aug 21, 2014

Black rage is founded on two-thirds a person

Rapings and beatings and suffering that worsens,

Black human packages tied up with strings,

Black rage can come from all these kinds of things.

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 
Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot
Aug 18, 2014 / 2,037 notes

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 

Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

(via afrodiaspores)

complexae:

Jiro Yoshihara
Aug 17, 2014 / 3,555 notes

complexae:

Jiro Yoshihara

(via palmares-politics)