The Latest

Sep 26, 2014 / 3 notes

olelooftheday:

Hawaiian Word of the Day:

ʻAʻo


(

Hawaiian Shearwater
(Puffinus newelli)

)

He ʻaʻo ka manu noho i ka lua, ʻaʻole e loaʻa i ka lima ke nao aku.

It’s an ʻaʻo, a bird that lives in a burrow and cannot be caught even when the arm is thrust into the hole.

Said of a person who is too smart to be caught.

From ʻŌlelo Noʻeau by Mary Kawena Pukui

Sep 22, 2014 / 6,746 notes
One of my mentors at Yale, the great anthropologist and art historian Robert Ferris Thompson, has documented that three of the most important words, and thus, concepts, brought to these (and other) shores via Africans are Cool, Funky, and Hip. My argument follows: you can no more separate Black from Cool than you can separate French cooking from France, or yoga from India. Cool has African roots, period. We, Black people, bring the aesthetic of Cool to the table of global culture, and should be recognized intellectually and economically for doing so.
Rebecca Walker, author of Black Cool (via howtobeterrell)

(via daughterofassata)

Sep 22, 2014 / 845 notes
Sep 21, 2014 / 2,172 notes

"Death of Crows"                                                                                                                        "Smoking Crows"                                                                                                                      "Mother of Crows"                                                                                                                "Amphibious Ambition"                                                                                                                  "The White Bird"                                                                                                                            "Land O’ Plenty"

Bill Mayer, 2014

(via actegratuit)

mermaidsofcolor:

afrodiaspores:


Laura R. Gadson, ”Reception At Ibo Landing,” ca. 2011, a quilt shown in Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore: A Fiber Arts Exhibition, 2012. Filmmaker and author Julie Dash told bell hooks,

The Ibo Landing myth – there are two myths and one reality…
Ibo captives, African captives of the Ibo [ethnic group, also spelled “Igbo”], when they were brought to the New World, they refused to live in slavery. There are accounts of them having walked into the water, and then on top of the water all the way back to Africa, you know, rather than live in slavery in chains. There are also myths of them having flown from the water, flown all the way back to Africa. And then there is the story – the truth or the myth – of them walking into the water and drowning themselves in front of the captors. 
I was able, in my research [for “Daughters of the Dust”], to read some of the accounts from the sailors who were on the ship when supposedly it happened, and a lot of the shipmates, the sailors or other crew members, they had nervous breakdowns watching this. Watching the Ibo men and women and children in shackles, walking into the water and holding themselves under the water until they in fact drowned. 
And then interestingly enough, in my research, I found that almost every Sea Island has a little inlet, or a little area where the people say, “This is Ibo Landing. This is where it happened. This is where this thing really happened.” And so, why is it that on every little island – and there are so many places – people say, “This is actually Ibo Landing”? It’s because that message is so strong, so powerful, so sustaining to the tradition of resistance, by any means possible, that every Gullah community embraces this myth. So I learned that myth is very important in the struggle to maintain a sense of self and to move forward into the future. 



because we need reminding 
Sep 17, 2014 / 2,525 notes

mermaidsofcolor:

afrodiaspores:

Laura R. Gadson, ”Reception At Ibo Landing,” ca. 2011, a quilt shown in Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore: A Fiber Arts Exhibition, 2012. Filmmaker and author Julie Dash told bell hooks,

The Ibo Landing myth there are two myths and one reality…

Ibo captives, African captives of the Ibo [ethnic group, also spelled “Igbo”], when they were brought to the New World, they refused to live in slavery. There are accounts of them having walked into the water, and then on top of the water all the way back to Africa, you know, rather than live in slavery in chains. There are also myths of them having flown from the water, flown all the way back to Africa. And then there is the story the truth or the myth of them walking into the water and drowning themselves in front of the captors.

I was able, in my research [for “Daughters of the Dust”], to read some of the accounts from the sailors who were on the ship when supposedly it happened, and a lot of the shipmates, the sailors or other crew members, they had nervous breakdowns watching this. Watching the Ibo men and women and children in shackles, walking into the water and holding themselves under the water until they in fact drowned.

And then interestingly enough, in my research, I found that almost every Sea Island has a little inlet, or a little area where the people say, “This is Ibo Landing. This is where it happened. This is where this thing really happened.” And so, why is it that on every little island and there are so many places people say, “This is actually Ibo Landing”? It’s because that message is so strong, so powerful, so sustaining to the tradition of resistance, by any means possible, that every Gullah community embraces this myth. So I learned that myth is very important in the struggle to maintain a sense of self and to move forward into the future. 

because we need reminding 

(via palmares-politics)

amusingabe:

Shadra Strickland
Sep 13, 2014 / 957 notes

amusingabe:

Shadra Strickland

nevver:

D.H. Lawrence
Sep 10, 2014 / 1,316 notes
Sep 9, 2014 / 3,144 notes
misterflaneur:

Pegge Hopper - Untitled
Sep 9, 2014 / 1,464 notes

misterflaneur:

Pegge Hopper - Untitled

(via amusingabe)

arquilatria:

White Center, 1950  Mark Rothko
Sep 9, 2014 / 168 notes

arquilatria:

White Center, 1950 
Mark Rothko

(via jbe200)